Tag Archives: security

HP Sure View Protects Your Privacy When Using a Computer

Check out this article from techtimes.com about the new HP Sure View screen available on the brand’s laptops for protecting the user’s privacy. Read more about this safety feature now:

device pitstop HP Sure View product

HP Uses New Laptop Privacy Screens To Keep Nosy People Out Of Your Business

By Fritz Gleyo

HP is continuing its campaign against possible IT threats, especially “visual hacking.” To help combat the problem, HP unveiled what it claims as the world’s only PCs with integrated privacy screens.

The integrated privacy screen comes to the HP EliteBook 840 and EliteBook 1040 as an optional feature called HP Sure View. By pressing the f2 key, the computer will enter privacy mode, which limits the visible light up to 95 percent when the screen is viewed at an angle and thereby, preventing prying eyes from seeing on-screen information.

“The addition of HP Sure View to our PC security solutions helps address the risks associated with visual hacking and gives customers the freedom to work more confidently and productively in public spaces,” says Alex Cho, HP’s vice president and general manager for commercial PCs.

HP developed HP Sure View with 3M privacy technology. Note that this is the same company that HP collaborated with to produce the privacy filters.

“HP Sure View helps address the concern of protecting sensitive information,” says Makoto Ishii, 3M’s vice president and general manager for the display materials and systems division.

According to a 2015 Ponemon Institute study titled “Global Cost of Cybercrime,” which was sponsored by Hewlett Packard Enterprise, data breaches cost large-sized organizations an average of $7.7 million.

A more recent Ponemon Institute study titled “Global Visual Hacking Experiment” (PDF) reveals that 91 percent of visual hacking attempts succeed. Moreover, roughly four kinds of private information get visually hacked in each attempt.

HP also associates employee productivity with visual hacking since 60 percent of them bring work outside of their offices. HP points to a 3M-sponsored study that found that employees who work in close proximity to others can be two times as productive when using a visual privacy solution.

Analysts say that the health care, security and finance industries, as well as the public sector are some of the possible immediate markets for the HP Sure View. HP says that integrating the privacy screen into the computer, as opposed to mounting them in front of the display, leads to better compliance with each company’s regulatory requirements.

Aside from the optional integrated privacy screens, both the mentioned HP EliteBooks come with fingerprint scanners and facial authentication for additional device security.

HP expects that the HP Sure View will be available starting September for the HP EliteBook 840 as well the non-touch and full HD touch versions of EliteBook 1040. The EliteBook 840 currently retails for $949 while the Elitebook 1040 is currently listed at $1,297.

Click here to see more from techtimes.com.

Go Local: Sell Your Smartphone at Your Neighborhood Device Pitstop

Sell your gently used smartphone the safe way, at your local Device Pitstop! Watch the video below to learn how a Las Vegas woman was scammed when trying to sell her smartphone online. And how you can avoid that danger—and get cash on-the-spot—by choosing to sell your smartphone at Device Pitstop instead.

Is Your Wireless Keyboard or Mouse Vulnerable to Hackers?

Check out the article below from Techlicious about a new form of data theft and how to keep your devices and information safe. You can also see the article on techlicious.com.

Device Pitstop model with wireless keyboard

Keyloggers Posing as Chargers Steal Wireless Data

by Elmer Montejo

Wireless keyboards and mice are the new way in to your data for hackers and scammers. A few months ago, researchers found that more than one billion mice and keyboards were vulnerable to hacking through their wireless transmitters. And, the latest trend: devices designed look like USB phone chargers that sniff passwords and text that you type into wireless keyboards.

Last month, the FBI sent out a warning to businesses about the vulnerability of wireless devices in offices. The culprit is a harmless-looking device known as the KeySweeper, a $10 device that masquerades as a USB phone charger but actually logs and decrypts keystrokes from older wireless Microsoft keyboards and devices.

Imagine if a device like the KeySweeper were plugged into an outlet in Starbucks or smuggled into your office and plugged in near the workstations. Anyone using a wireless device would be wide open for data harvesting — passwords, personally identifiable information, trade secrets, intellectual property, sensitive information or anything typed into a wireless keyboard. Because the theft happens over the air long before your keystrokes reach your computer, “security managers may not have insight into how sensitive information is being stolen,” warned the FBI advisory.

The KeySweeper can intercept radio frequency signals from some Microsoft wireless keyboards made before 2011. Many of these are still available in stores. Microsoft maintains that KeySweeper can’t attack its Bluetooth-enabled keyboards. And its 2.4-gigahertz wireless keyboards released after 2011 are immune because they use Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) encryption technology.

Hiding behind hardware from another company might not be the safety net you’d hoped. The FBI advisory suggests that similar devices could be programmed to exploit non-Microsoft wireless keyboards and devices.

The KeySweeper uses a Subscriber Identity Module (SIM) to send harvested data to web servers over a cellular connection. It can forward text containing flagged keywords such as URLs to a mobile device via SMS. The device even includes a flash memory module to store data in case SMS functionality is unavailable and a rechargeable battery for backup power.

The best way to avoid this hardware vulnerability is to avoid using wireless input devices in offices and other places accessible by many people. Instead, use wired devices, or use newer devices with AES encryption or Bluetooth with encryption and a strong PIN. The FBI recommends restricting the use of mobile chargers that look like the KeySweeper in offices.

Replace your old keyboard and mouse

When you’re using a wireless keyboard and mouse on the go, you’ll want the best combination of usability and portability. Here are our picks to replace your data-leaking devices.

For a keyboard, we like the Logitech K480 Multi-Device Bluetooth Keyboard ($36.79 on Amazon). Not only does it works with Windows tablets (and Macs), it also can pair with your Android and iOS devices, Apple TV (2nd and 3rd generation) and any other device that supports Bluetooth keyboards. And it can be paired with up to three devices at a time. When you move between devices, just turn the device dial to switch. The K480 is a full-size keyboard and has nicely spaced chicklet-style keys for easy typing. It comes in black or white and features a handy slot to hold your tablet.

If you’re looking for new mouse, we like the Logitech MX Anywhere 2 mouse ($59.99 on Amazon). In addition to Bluetooth, the MX Anywhere 2 comes with a tiny RF receiver that you can plug into your PC or Mac laptop. The mouse can pair with up to three devices and switching between them is a simple matter of touching a button. The mouse uses Logitech’s Dark Field Laser sensor, which offers great tracking on any surface, even high gloss surfaces. The mouse’s rechargeable battery lasts up to two months between charges.

Click here to see more from techlicious.com.

Do You Need a Password Manager? Yes!

In today’s increasingly digital world, most people have too many usernames and passwords to count! It’s hard enough to keep track of all of them, let alone think about how to store them in a safe-yet-accessible place. Enter a password manager. A password manager is basically a digital vault that securely stores all of your login information for various websites and accounts, and it’s easily accessible with just one super-strong password.

Check out more information about the following three password managers to determine which one would work best for you. Then shred all of those password-containing pieces of paper laying around your office!

 

LastPass

In today’s increasingly digital world, most people have too many usernames and passwords to count! It’s hard enough to keep track of all of them, let alone think about how to store them in a safe-yet-accessible place. Enter a password manager. A password manager is basically a digital vault that securely stores all of your login information for various websites and accounts, and it’s easily accessible with just one super-strong password.   Check out more information about the following three password managers to determine which one would work best for you. Then shred all of those password-containing pieces of paper laying around your office!
Image from LastPass website.

 

Dashlane

Device Pitstop Dashlane image from website
Image from Dashlane website.

 

Sticky Password

Device Pitstop Sticky Password image from website
Image from Sticky Password website.